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Advanced Settings
133
A750 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router JR6150
As an example of when a static route is needed, consider a situation with the following
elements:
Your primary Internet access is through a cable modem to an ISP.
You have an ISDN router on your home network for connecting to the company where
you are employed. This router’s address on your LAN is 192.168.1.100.
Your company’s network address is 134.177.0.0.
When you first configured your router, two implicit static routes were created. A default route
was created with your ISP as the gateway, and a second static route was created to your
local network for all 192.168.1.x addresses. With this configuration, if you attempt to access a
device on the 134.177.0.0 network, your router forwards your request to the ISP. The ISP
forwards your request to the company where you are employed, and the company’s firewall
denies the request.
In this case you must define a static route, telling your router that 134.177.0.0 should be
accessed through the ISDN router at 192.168.1.100. This example assumes the following
settings:
The Destination IP Address and IP Subnet Mask fields specify that this static route
applies to all 134.177.x.x addresses.
The Gateway IP Address field specifies that all traffic for these addresses should be
forwarded to the ISDN router at 192.168.1.100.
A metric value of 1 works because the ISDN router is on the LAN.
The Private check box is selected only as a precautionary security measure in case RIP
is activated.
To set up a static route:
1. Log in to the router.
For more information, see Use NETGEAR genie after Installation on page 17.
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